Our Travels… During a Global Pandemic

The last two years have not been easy for travellers like us. The emergence of COVID-19 in late 2019 – or, for the majority of us outside Wuhan, in early 2020 – followed by a seemingly endless number of variants, have led to an endless stream of rescheduled flights and cancelled hotels. Yet for all these challenges, the intrepid team at World Words still found some ways to get out and explore, whether it was by seeing the sights closer to home, by taking advantage of brief travel windows, or even by basing themselves in a new location before restrictions took hold.

We wrote about some of our adventures during the last two pandemic-hit years for the Our Travels section of our blog. Now, to mark the beginning of a brand new year (and in the hope of a less restricted 2022) we’ve collated five of our favourite blog posts here. You can scroll down to read extracts or follow the links to read the full posts…

A herd of elephants cross the slow-moving Ewasu Ngiru River that runs through Samburu.

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Our Travels: Samburu Reserve, Kenya

We’re now almost halfway through 2020 and, let’s be honest, this has been a pretty disastrous year for travel. The outbreak of coronavirus around six months ago not just led to the cancelling of long-standing international holiday plans, but also prevented the kind of spontaneous, last-minute travels – both overseas and closer to home – that our intrepid team of travel writers love the most. It’s been a tricky time for anybody who likes to explore the world.

Luckily, while new trips have been thin on the ground, we have a locker-full of pre-pandemic adventures to share with you through the Our Travels blog series. Regular readers will have already seen accounts of exciting recent adventures covering destinations as varied as Mexico, Lebanon¬†and Australia. This month, it’s the the turn of our editor-in-chef Joe, who recounts his safari trip to Kenya at the beginning of the year. Scroll down to read about it…

A coalition of four cheetahs get to work devouring an impala in Samburu National Reserve.

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